Foulridge to Nelson

Thursday 14th July 2016

Today was the day of our first group of guests were to join us as around midday. We spent the morning cleaning up nb Lucy and making her partially presentable. There is only so much you can do to an old girl to make her young again. The sky was a bright blue with no clouds in the sky so took the opportunity to go for a walk over the top of the tunnel that we will be going through later today. It is about a 1.2k walk that takes you to a rather large reservoir.

On the way we passed this Doggy Day Care sign which took our fancy. There seems to be a propensity to use the word bespoke which really means “made to order”. Not quite sure what kind of bespoking can be done at a Doggy Daycare facility.

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We are currently moored up at this old warehouse which has been turned into a very trendy Café. Good location for our guests to join us as it is well known to all and hopefully including the taxi driver. It is a long way from Canada to London then Wigan by train with an overnight plus another train to Colne and then taxi to Foulbridge to hop on board a moving object. We give Al and Susan credit.

 

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The good news is that they joined us on a sunny day so hopefully are not going to be initially put off by the weather. We had a quick lunch in the café and then straight into it. We hit them with a 1.5k Foulridge Tunnel within the first 500 meters and then into the seven Barrowford Locks going downhill.

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As we hit the summit yesterday it now means it is all the way downhill to Liverpool from now on. As we said in the last blog, this is a baptism by fire. They did remarkably well as they were bombarded with a lot of technical information.

We have left the predominately rural landscape for the moment as we now cruise through a number of reasonable sized towns. Our mooring tonight was right behind a large Morrison’s supermarket where we will take the opportunity to top up the larder.

Tonight is being spent settling in the new crew and boring them to tears with the history of the British inland waterway system.

 

 


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